21 April 2013

Pattaya Analysis - Part 1

I usually do an analysis after every event my kids play, which I discuss with them and then decide see how to progress from there. I am sharing our experience relating to the just-completed Bangkok Open. Hopefully, my thinking processes on the issues that we, as a chess-playing family with limited financial budget, have to address, will be helpful to parents in similar circumstances. 

Part 1 is a brief analysis of Yit Ho's results from Bangkok Open, looking at just the outcomes and not from analysing the actual games.

Fong Yit Ho (2006)

Opponent



Rd.

Name
RtgI
FED
Pts.
Age
Res.
rtg+/-
1
IM
Stokke Kjetil
2403
NOR
5.5
30
0
-1.2
2

Sonowal Aryan
1437
IND
3

1
1.2
3

Imocha Laishram
2204
IND
4.5
43
0
-3.6
4

Sugeng Mulijanto
0
INA
3.5

1

5
CM
Puranik Abhimanyu
2183
IND
5
13
0
-4.05
6

P Pinatpong
0
THA
2

1

7

Vospernik Andrej
2170
SLO
4
48
1
10.8
8

Frosch Ronald
2220
AUT
5
33
0
-3.45
9

Kivimaki Jaakko
2197
FIN
5
59
0
-3.75







4
-4.05

Round 1 was lost to an active IM. Result was within expectations and just confirms the view that 2400 is a target that is still too far at this point for Yit Ho.

Rounds 2, 4 & 6 saw wins against unrated players and a much lower rated player. No disasters there but not much meaningful conclusions to be drawn.

Round 5 was a loss to 13-year old up and coming P Abhimanyu from India, who is probably playing much stronger than his 2183 rating indicates.

Yit Ho v P Abhimanyu
Photo courtesy of Jeff Wong
 Round 3, 7, 8, 9 were the defining match-ups against serious adult players in the 2150-2250 range, whose ratings are probably reflective of their playing strength. 3 losses and one win, which suggests that the sole win is an exception, rather than a sign of consistent strength.

I was told that the single win was from a 20-minute game where the opponent lost in the opening. Yit Ho probably caught this guy on a bad day, maybe too much to drink or not enough sleep the night before in 'exciting' Pattaya or just a usual once-in-a-while fumble of a 2170 player. We don't know but I wouldn't see too much into this win. But then again, a win is a win.

The Round 7 win broke the Swiss Yo-yo and provided Yit Ho with an additional higher-rated opponent.
Yit Ho v J Kivimaki - Round 9
Photo from thefidetrainer.com

Yit Ho v Sugeng Mulijanto - Round 4
Photo courtesy of Jeff Wong
Conclusions:
Yit Ho won all the games he was expected to win and with one exception, lost all the games he was expected to lose. He lost 4 rating points due primarily to not getting any credit for two wins against unrated players, but which was however partially offset by the ‘bonus’ win against a 2170-rated opponent.

The only thing that we could have hoped for from the event was maybe match-ups against opponents within a 100-point rating difference once it was clear that +150 was too much.

The immediate development target is to break through the mysterious ‘2200 barrier’ that defines the master chess player. Based on the Bangkok Open results, Yit Ho is certainly not at this 2200 level at this point in time. How we plan to progress from here shall be discussed in a later instalment.

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